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Indiana Laws Relating to Workplace Violence

Filed under Managing the Workplace. Fact checked on May 25, 2012.

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A summary of Indiana laws relating to weapons and conduct that impact workplace violence.

An employee may not be prohibited from possessing a firearm or ammunition that is locked in the trunk of the employee's vehicle, kept in the glove compartment of the employee's locked vehicle, or stored out of plain sight in the employee's locked vehicle.

Indiana residents have the right to carry a handgun with a license, if all the requirements of the Indiana Firearms Act are met. An individual may not carry a handgun in any vehicle or on or about his or her person, except in the individual's dwelling, property or fixed place of business, without having a license to carry the weapon in his or her possession.

The licensing requirement does not apply to judicial officers, law enforcement officers, employees of express companies when engaged in company business, persons whose business is the manufacture, repair or selling of handguns while in the regular course of business and any person carrying a handgun unloaded and in a secure wrapper from the place of purchase to that person's home or business, to a place of repair or when moving from one home or business to another.

A person is justified in using reasonable force against another person to protect the person or a third person from what the person reasonably believes to be the imminent use of unlawful force. However, a person is justified in using deadly force and does not have a duty to retreat if the person reasonably believes that use of deadly force is necessary to prevent serious bodily injury to the person or a third person or the commission of a forcible felony. A person in Indiana is not placed in legal jeopardy of any kind whatsoever for protecting the person or a third person by reasonable means necessary.

With respect to property other than a dwelling or occupied motor vehicle, a person is justified in using reasonable force against another person if the person reasonably believes that the force is necessary to immediately prevent or terminate the other person's trespass on or criminal interference with property lawfully in the person's possession, lawfully in possession of a member of the person's immediate family, or belonging to a person whose property the person has authority to protect.

A person is justified in using deadly force and does not have a duty to retreat only if that force is justified because the person reasonably believes that use of deadly force is necessary to prevent serious bodily injury to the person or a third person or the commission of a forcible felony.

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