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Puerto Rico Laws Relating to Workplace Violence

Filed under Managing the Workplace. Fact checked on May 25, 2012.

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A summary of Puerto Rico laws relating to weapons and conduct that impact workplace violence.

It is unlawful to have or possess, bear, carry or transport any pistol, revolver or other firearm without having a license for the weapon. Also, it is unlawful to carry a loaded pistol, revolver or other firearm, while at the same time bearing, carrying or transporting ammunition used for discharging the pistol, revolver or other firearm without a license to carry weapons. A license is required to bear, carry or transport parts of firearms, even for purposes of repair.

The following persons will be authorized by the Superintendent of Police to lawfully have, possess, bear, transport and carry a revolver or pistol because of the nature of their office and the duties they perform:

  • judges, prosecuting attorneys, clerks, marshals and deputy marshals of the courts of Puerto Rico, as well as judges, prosecuting attorneys, deputy prosecuting attorneys, marshals and deputy marshals and the clerks of the courts of the United States who are discharging their duties in Puerto Rico
  • the members of the legislature and any official of the government of Puerto Rico
  • mail carriers, during the discharge of their duties as mail carriers
  • carriers and custodians of public funds, while public funds are in their custody
  • employees of the commonwealth, provided the request is authorized and justified by the head of the dependency for which the person works
  • internal revenue collectors and agents, at the request of the secretary of the treasury and the inspectors of the public service commission, at the request of the chairperson of the public service commission
  • former governors, judges, prosecuting attorneys and legislators who have completed at least one term of their election and/or appointment, unless otherwise approved by the superintendent of police
  • ambassadors, consuls or officials from foreign countries recognized by the United States government
  • former police officers with 10 or more years of service and whose retirement or resignation has been honorable and police officers with less than 10 years of service with prior approval
  • federal officials whose duties justify the granting of a firearm license
  • carriers of private funds and custodians of private funds in banking institutions, while the private funds are in their custody, if justified
  • persons rendering security services to public or private enterprises, while rendering security services, if justified

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